Trevor Noah is leaving ‘The Daily Show’

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Image Source: CNN

Trevor Noah, host of “The Daily Show,” has made known his intention to leave his role.

Noah announced in a video statement posted on Twitter on Thursday that after seven years as the host of the Comedy Central program, his “time is up.”

Trevor Noah said that the past seven years have been incredible and unlike anything he had ever imagined. Trevor Noah, the Daily Show’s host, witnessed the Trump administration, the pandemic, and several other major global events during this time. After seven years, Noah decided his time as host was up.

South African stand-up comedian Noah was relatively unknown to American audiences when he took over as host of “The Daily Show” in 2015 when Jon Stewart retired.

Late Night Television is changing as Trevor Noah bows out

After more than 30 years, Johnny Carson’s reign as late-night television king is coming to an end with Trevor Noah’s departure from the “Daily Show.” The hosts who took over “The Tonight Show” after TV’s king had left them had a significant impact because they acted as though winning that “throne” was the peak of success in the entertainment industry and competed for it appropriately.

Following James Corden’s announcement that he will quit CBS’ “Late Late Show” next year, Trevor Noah’s decision to leave “The Daily Show” shows that being a late-night comedian is not always a life sentence for the newer generation of comics.

David Letterman and Jay Leno, who was directly descended from Carson, recognized “The Tonight Show” as the most sought title in television comedy. Conan O’Brien, the third member of the trio who rose to prominence as a part of the late-night shift after Carson wished everyone “A very emotional goodbye” in 1992, displayed the same workaholic mindset by sticking around for more than three decades (although in different locations).

Stephen Colbert and Jimmy Fallon are firmly established at CBS and NBC. Jimmy Kimmel recently extended his contract with ABC through the 23rd season. Those who took the baton pass from that trio, metaphorically if not physically, appear to stay similarly dedicated to their seats.

But that reflects a mentality that originated in a previous era of television, when viewers were seen to be creatures of habit who watched Carson every year before night, regardless of the guests or the number of vacation weeks he took near the end of his run.

In that regard, “Saturday Night Live,” despite being a somewhat different animal, serves as a metaphor for the inertia that governed television when it first debuted during Gerald Ford’s presidency, adding new cast members while continuing to run as the show gets ready to begin its 48th season.

However, Noah made it clear that despite taking over for Jon Stewart seven years ago, he still has comedy mountains to scale that doesn’t include working at a desk.

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Positively, increased late-night turnover will open doors for new perspectives and diverse talent at a time when late-night shows have experienced some cutbacks after everyone seemed to be jumping on board.

Notably, Stewart’s version of “The Daily Show” gave rise to the majority of the current generation of late-night performers, including Colbert, Samantha Bee, John Oliver, and Noah.

After some time in the wilderness, Stewart has decided on his idea of a second act, consisting of a show on Apple TV+ and a lot of campaigning for causes he supports, highlighted by his support for veterans. When Carson left “Tonight truly,” neither Letterman nor Leno had chosen to follow in his footsteps and retire.

It remains to be seen where Noah and Corden go from here. But we’ve entered a different Game of Thrones now than the Late Night era that Carson characterized.